New short-stories on the website

Just a quick note to say that I've added several science-fiction short stories to this website. At least one of them hasn't been on this website before (I think). If you'd like to read them, click on the highlighted links. They are:

18% Happier - This is a dialogue-based, comedy, science-fiction short-story in which a man rings a computer help-line and pours out his unhappiness at his girlfriend's behaviour, technology and the false-promises it has brought. This, I think, was a big step forward in terms of writing. I focussed on dialogue, a fast-pace and funny, thought-provoking ideas. Fortunately, it got a runners-up prize in Arc science-fiction magazine, which was a huge confidence boost.

The Lost Emotion (which is basically a monologue) This won a short-story competition in 'Arc' science-fiction magazine, years ago. I still like it. I especially the fact that it's based on an intriguing scientific discovery. that if we make an expression, we will feel the corresponding emotion. For example, if we make ourselves smile, we will feel happier. 'The Lost Emotion' expands on that idea, with a twist. Seasoned readers probably won't be surprised that it has a dystopian element but hey, I do try to make my stories at least a little realistic. ;-)

Tags is a science-fiction short story that draws upon the ideas and evidence I've described in my articles about a Laser Transmission from Sirius and Evolution and Alien Viruses. I entered the story in a competition, yonks ago, who's name I can't even remember but I didn't get selected. Rather than it being lost at the back of a proverbial shelf, here it is for you to read.

The Pique of Civilisation is another dialogue-based, science-fiction, comedy short story. I'm usually reluctant to write stupid female characters, although I have no problems at all writing stupid male characters. I guess that's a sort of inverted sexism. In this case, I did write two idiotic female characters and I think it works. These two ladies are incredibly shallow in an amusing way and there are ladies out there of that ilk, so it's a reasonable thing to do. Hopefully, you'll find it thought-provoking and funny too.

'How science shows...' is now available on Kindle

Just a quick note to say that my science book 'How science shows that almost everything important we've been told is wrong' is now available as a digital ebook from the Amazon website. It’s available as a digital download for £2.29, $2.99 or free as part of Kindle Unlimited. The digital version of the book is shorter than the paperback version. I've left out the chapter on ancient history, mostly because it's not part of the core ideas of the book and also to keep the file size down. To be honest, that chapter only ended up in the paperback version because I was trying to put in enough material to make a substantial-sized book. I've also set that if someone buys the print version, they can get the digital version for free but I've no idea if it's working or not, as that is very much amazon's business. The images in the digital version are low-res to try and keep the file size down, so apologies in advance if they're a bit grainy. Apart from all that, I'm pleased with how it looks and I think it's well worth what is now the price of a coffee in London. But then again, I probably would say that! :-)


The simple logic of a new view of reality

In the last two months, I've been receiving some good feedback on my book 'How science shows that almost everything important we've been told is wrong'. People do seem to be enjoying the humour and the clear explanation of the scientific topics. So far, no one's complimented me on my illustrations, which is a bit disappointing :-(.(Maybe they appreciate them subconsciously?) but otherwise, the comments have been complimentary and encouraging.

One interesting pattern so far in the feedback is that readers will read the whole of the book but then take issue over a minor point, rather than discuss the book's core points. For example, readers have taken issue over the idea that the Ancient Egyptians actually sent their pharaoh god's spirit to Thuban on a ray of light. I do make it clear that such an idea cannot be proven with science and remains simply a supposition, a reporting of the Ancient Egyptian belief. The actual solid evidence on that topic shows only that the Ancient Egyptians built the Great Pyramid to beam a ray of light at the star Thuban in 2787 BC, the moment in history when it was actually, physically possible to send a ray of light successfully to another star from a fixed structure located on Earth.

Even though the 'Great Pyramid, Thuban and 2787BC' theory is solid and significant, it's not the truly important element of the book. I'm going to describe, below, THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF THE BOOK in just three statements. These statements are entirely scientific but their conclusion is profound. Here goes:

1) Everything physical in the universe, if left to its own devices, becomes more disordered over time. This is known as the Law of Entropy or 'the Second Law of Thermodynamics'.

2) But there is a problem; Life becomes more ordered over time. Life turns simple matter (gases, water) into highly complex structures (DNA, proteins, cells). The phenomena of Life cannot be explained away as a result of the sun's energy, as energy and order are not related; a hot gas is no more ordered than a cold gas. In fact, increasing energy invariably increases disorder, not the other way round. Life's ordering effect therefore cannot be coming from a purely physical cause.

3) Therefore, since Life is
increasing order in our universe and everything in our universe, if left to its own devices, decreases in order, then Life must be being influenced by something outside of our universe, outside of physical reality.

It's definitely worth reading the third statement more than once, to get one's head around it. Once one has done that, the statement's consequences start to take shape and they are extensive and profound. 'How science shows' explores some of those consequences but not all (there's too many to fit in one book!).

Although the above, third statement may seem controversial, in many ways, science established that conclusion decades ago. In cosmology, the riddles of the Baryon Asymmetry Problem, the Fine Tuning Problem and Boltzmann's Well-Ordered Universe Problem can only be solved by accepting that an intelligence created our universe and that intelligence continued to exert a positive, organising influence over the universe. For more on that topic, do please read this earlier blog post.

Therefore, it can be scientifically proven that Materialism, the idea that only physical things exist, is wrong. Materialism is impossible in our universe. Our universe has to have been created by an organising intelligence, originating from outside of physical reality. In addition, all living things in our universe have to be physical manifestations of organising influences originating from outside of physical reality; that's the only way they can exist and defy entropy, according to our scientific understanding.

What's fascinating is that once a person accepts the above three statements, then everything about our lives and reality becomes profoundly different; that's why I chose such a provocative title to the book. All the extra stuff in 'How Science Shows…' about pyramids and Atlantis and corn-on-the-cob is fun and valid, but of secondary importance to the third statement written out above. It's that statement that is so important, as it is the Galileo's Telescope that brings the Holy Church of Materialism and Atheism crashing down to the ground. Viva La Revolution! ;-)

Adrian Ellis, 12th Oct 2016

'How science shows...' is now available to buy

My new non-fiction, popular science book 'How science shows that almost everything important we've been told is wrong' is now available to buy as a printed book stuffed with 300 pages of intriguing ideas, fascinating info, cute illustrations and the odd spelling mistake. It can be bought directly from the FeedaRead website, priced at £7.99 plus postage. It will also be available to order from major booksellers in three or four weeks time, after the files etc feed through to the distributors. Its ISBN-13 number is: 9781786970916. Here's the cover blurb:

“Nowadays, our scientific establishment makes out that they've pretty much understood all the important bits about reality, life, death, ourselves, the universe and well, everything. Unfortunately, this isn't true. In fact, many very important physicists in the last century pointed out that a fundamentally different view of the universe was needed to solve major paradoxes in science such as Schrödinger's Cat and the very nature of the Big Bang. This book describes what they discovered and more, thereby explaining the true nature of reality, life, death, God, ghosts, the brain, the Big Bang, evolution, aliens, pyramids, particles, Atlantis and, most especially, corn-on-the-cob. It also has lots of appealing illustrations and the odd joke, so you won't get bored half-way through.”

For more information on the book, check out its section on this website's home page.

Psi-Earth - 1 - An 'alternative Earth' story


This blog article is related to my new book; ’How science shows that almost everything important we’ve been told is wrong’, which will soon be ready to buy from the FeedaRead website and available to order from large booksellers as well. It has an ISBN-13 number (9781786970916). More info on the book is available on its web page.

To sum up the book again, ’How science shows…’ explains that the waking reality that we inhabit is a light-energy pattern that our minds collectively influence at the quantum level. In other words, reality isn’t a hard, solid place, a collection of independent objects that we can’t influence. Instead, reality is an ephemeral construction, a collaborative mental creation. Not only that, but our minds don’t come into existence from physical reality, we, as thinking minds, perceive and influence reality from a source outside of reality. As a result, our minds create our physical brains and bodies, not the other way around. It’s effectively turning the current official scientific view upside down, but by using evidence and theories put forward by eminent scientists; weird but true.
While thinking about the ideas in the book, I realised that the ideas in the book could be used to create a thrilling drama about a group of talented individuals up against a powerful and secretive elite. I thought it would be good to blog ideas about it on this website, as a sort of on-going production diary. I’m currently focussed on completing a science-fiction comedy novel, but it might be fun to develop and blog about another novel story, with its accompanying ‘alternative Earth’ theme, at the same time. I’m going to call this ‘alternative Earth’ Psi-Earth, after the Greek letter Psi (which looks like a three-pronged fork), which is traditionally associated with extra-sensory or paranormal abilities.

Psi-Earth is just like our Earth now, our current-day situation, except that Psi-Earth is a place where the ideas put forward in ‘How science shows…’ are both correct and are being successfully used, akin to the Ancient Egyptians or the Tibetans. Just to recap, if the book’s ideas are correct, then human beings can potentially (with a lot of effort) develop the following abilities:

The ability to gather information and perceive places, events and details remote to one’s location, both in space and time. This is currently described as ‘remote viewing’ but was also called ‘scrying’ in the past.

The ability to sense or be aware of potential events in the future. This is currently described as ‘precognition’, while the word ‘prescience’ is more associated with calculated anticipation.

The ability to move one’s mind and ‘spirit body’ to another location, separate from one’s physical body. This is usually referred to as ‘astral projection’ or ‘spirit travelling’.

The existence and potential ability to communicate with other minds that are not currently connected to a physical body, or minds existing at very remote locations.

The ability to generate power and create material using mental manipulation of energetic phenomena at a quantum level.

(Note: For readers interested in the historical and modern evidence for people actually possessing these skills, I recommend the books ‘Magic and Mystery in Tibet’ by Alexandra David-Neil. For a more recent study of people developing skills in this area, I’d recommend 'Margins of Reality' by Prof Robert Jahn, ‘Psi Spies’ by Jim Marrs and almost any non-fiction book by Ingo Swann, who worked as a remote viewer for the U.S. Military).

It doesn’t take much thought to imagine that Earth would become an incredible and amazing place if such paranormal abilities were possible and also that the majority of people on Earth could use them. Our civilisation would become filled with super-druids, Tibetan Masters and Buddhist Bodhisattvas all making use of zero-point, cold-fusion technology, It all sounds extremely cool but it would be almost unrecognisable compared to our current situation, which isn't really the idea of the Psi-Earth story, so I won't be writing about that.

Instead, the Psi-Earth story would be a darker, everyday, 'almost like normal' story based around the idea that certain powerful and secretive groups had known for some time that reality was a light-energy pattern and that our minds influence and shape reality. These groups have, by the present day of the story, developed mind-assisted zero-point energy generators, mind-assisted cold-fusion units, telepathy skills, remote viewing, out-of-body journeying, prescience etc. Not surprisingly in the story, these groups have, as a result, gained a huge advantage over everyone else, all the ordinary people who continue to believe that only physical things exists and that our minds are nothing more that the side-effects of chemical activity. These secretive, elite groups are the real Lords of Psi-Earth, the people who really control the planet and everyone on it.

In comparison, nearly all the ordinary people of Psi-Earth believe something fundamentally different. They all believe in Materialism or in some irrational religious belief-system. These belief systems keep the ordinary people blind to the true situation, that they all have the potential to do amazing things, to do things that they think only belong to the ‘gods’ or fictional wizards. The ancient Hermetica tellingly said that; ‘a god is an immortal man and man, a mortal god’ but the ordinary people of Psi-Earth are blind to this fact. They have been hobbled by believing falsehoods. This makes the Psi-Earth story darkly oppressive because everyone on Earth is in a prison of their own beliefs. They are not being subjugated through brute-force by oppressive overlords putting up huge billboards threatening punishments or sending gestapo-like-squads hunting down perpetrators, but by a more powerful and subtle obstacle; the widespread adoption of a convincing false belief, which is a far more effective barrier.

In Plato’s ‘Critias’, the Egyptian Priest states:

“In the days of old the gods had the whole earth distributed among them by allotment… They all peopled [populated] their own districts; and when they had peopled them they tended us, their nurselings and possessions, as shepherds tend their flocks, excepting only that they did not use blows or bodily force, as shepherds do, but governed us like pilots from the stern of the vessel, which is an easy way of guiding animals, holding our souls by the rudder of persuasion according to their own pleasure; thus did they guide all mortal creatures.”

The Psi-Earth story is a 21st Century version of this very situation; of a small number of elite groups controlling all the ordinary people of Earth through clever persuasion. In the story, Earth’s history can be re-interpreted. The strategy of the Catholic Church to violently suppress all shamanic and wicca practices for two thousand years was not part of a Christian ideology but simply a plan steered by secret groups within the Catholic Church to eradicate any development of psi-skills among ordinary people. In addition, the development of secular science was also infiltrated by secretive, powerful groups who steered that movement to promulgate a mistaken belief in Materialism. That establishment then pushed a secular message, that ‘paranormal’ abilities were a waste of time, indicative only of stupidity or insanity. In that way, the secret power groups of Psi-Earth used both the religious and scientific establishments to keep the ordinary people ignorant and powerless.

At this point in the Psi-Earth story, we need a hero or two enter the stage. Just as in any thrilling drama, we need a group of people who find out the truth, find out what they can do. In that way, it’s like the TV series ‘Heroes’, except that these people in Psi-Earth realise that everyone can have these abilities, not just some select few.

At the beginning, most of these individuals are naive; they think that everyone will want to know what they’ve found and the good it will do to humanity. They don’t realise that the secret elite don’t want everyone to know because if that happened, the secret elite would lose their advantage over everyone else, their power and control. The secret elite groups may fight each other sometimes but they are united in one goal; to stop all the ordinary people of Psi-Earth discovering what they themselves are capable of.

Our heroes, freshly aware of the truth, are immediately in great danger. As soon as they begin openly talking about what they’ve found, the secret groups spot them and close in. The secret groups can spot them quickly partly because they've set up organisations that pretend to help develop psi-skills as ‘honey traps’. These organisations draw the newbie psi-people in, thereby uncovering anyone with strong abilities so they can target them specifically.

The only thing that prevents our heroes dying at this early stage in the hands of the secret elite's assassins is that the secret elite don’t want to kill our heroes blatantly. If our heroes are clearly assassinated then that would draw attention to them and what they were working on, which is the last things the secret elite groups want. The secret elite therefore do want to kill our heroes but at the same time, they want the deaths to look like suicides, accidents, unlucky illnesses etc.

All these elements should make for a darkly dramatic situation that has an element of black-humour; a modern-day world where some curious people are putting forward ideas that are actually true but are officially said to be rubbish and generally laughed at. Our heroes face ridicule, crises of confidence and disinformation even before the lethal dangers appear. Then, they are embroiled in a life-threatening but paradoxical situation where secret and powerful groups (who don’t officially exist) are trying to kill them while making sure that the murders will be regarded as suicides or some sad twist of fate.

I’ll blog again on this topic soon. In the meantime, it's back to the science-fiction comedy.

The Great Secret graphic novel is now available to buy

The Great Secret graphic novel (190 pages of visual story adventure) is now available as a digital download for Kindle and for the iPad. I’ve asked a few friends to check out the digital version and it all looks good so far, but I’m keen to get as much (helpful) feedback as possible. If you do buy a digital copy (currently £4.99) and you like it, I’d be most grateful if you put in a review on the vendor’s site. If you have any problems with your copy of the graphic novel, do please let me know via the contact form or in the comments field on ‘the great secret’ page (currently under construction) which also contains more info on the book. Read More...

Science fiction predictions

In my last blog post, I talked about science fiction ideas and how they can come about. As a follow-on, here's a video on the same topic from PBS digital studios project called 'It's Okay to be Smart'. I found out about it from a recent Brainpickings article:

The video is lots of fun and it does a good job of celebrating how many predictions such science-fiction authors as H.G.Wells, Jules Verne, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke and Douglas Adams got right about our modern world. As the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Nils Bohr once said, “Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." :-)

02 4G article is now live

Just to let everyone know that the thousand word article I wrote for the O2 mobile phone company is now available to read here. It’s part of their eBook collection of articles exploring the benefits of 4G wireless technology for small to medium businesses (SMB’s) and is mentioned on their site here. My article begins by explaining the difficulties of predicting future use of technology (with examples) but then has a stab anyway, focussing in particular on the importance of latency in multimedia communication and its effect of the psychology of those taking part. There’s also some funny sci-fi ideas to make the technology pill easier to swallow. I did enjoy writing the piece; having a technically solid framework and clear remit can really get the creative juices flowing. Enjoy!

Advice from Bill (Calvin & Hobbs) Watterson

I heartily recommend this article from in which Bill Watterson, the creator of Calvin & Hobbs, talks about his experiences and gives advice on what it means to pursue a creative life. Along with Ray Bradbury’s thoughts, I think they do a brilliant job of bringing across the life of someone wishing to be a full-time creative person.

I’ve popped a cartoon from the article here as a taster. Hopefully, they won’t mind. Enjoy! Read More...

Ray Bradbury on rejections

Here’s another gem from the Brainpickings website. This one’s from an article about writing tips and includes a quote from Ray Bradbury about getting rejections. It’s succinct, personal and very encouraging:

The amazing Blackstone came to town when I was seven, and I saw how he came alive onstage and thought, God, I want to grow up to be like that! And I ran up to help him vanish an elephant. To this day I don’t know where the elephant went. One moment it was there, the next — abracadabra — with a wave of the wand it was gone!

In 1929 Buck Rogers came into the world, and on that day in October a single panel of Buck Rogers comic strip hurled me into the future. I never came back.

It was only natural when I was twelve that I decided to become a writer and laid out a huge roll of butcher paper to begin scribbling an endless tale that scrolled right on up to Now, never guessing that the butcher paper would run forever.

Snoopy has written me on many occasions from his miniature typewriter, asking me to explain what happened to me in the great blizzard of rejection slips of 1935. Then there was the snowstorm of rejection slips in ’37 and ’38 and an even worse winter snowstorm of rejections when I was twenty-one and twenty-two. That almost tells it, doesn’t it, that starting when I was fifteen I began to send short stories to magazines like Esquire, and they, very promptly, sent them back two days before they got them! I have several walls in several rooms of my house covered with the snowstorm of rejections, but they didn’t realize what a strong person I was; I persevered and wrote a thousand more dreadful short stories, which were rejected in turn. Then, during the late forties, I actually began to sell short stories and accomplished some sort of deliverance from snowstorms in my fourth decade. But even today, my latest books of short stories contain at least seven stories that were rejected by every magazine in the United States and also in Sweden! So, dear Snoopy, take heart from this. The blizzard doesn’t last forever; it just seems so.

Sci-fi short stories are go...

blogEntryThumbnailJust a quick note to say that the graphic novel has had to take a back seat (again) as I'm now working on some humorous science-fiction short stories in a similar vein to '18% happier'. That story has had a lot of good feedback (more on that soon) and so I feel I should go with the flow and write some more of that ilk. Hopefully, I'll come up with a dozen or so and put them together in a collection.

Until then, here's the emblem/logo I came up with for the collection: Read More...

Complaints made in the margins of illuminated manuscripts

blogEntryThumbnailHere's another gem of an article from This one's a list of comments, well, grumblings mainly, left in the margins of illuminated manuscripts. I liked the last one in the list most of all. Clicking on the image will take you to the original brainpickings entry.


Austin Kleon: Steal like an artist

Among the interesting nuggets in this week's newsletter from is an article about Austin Kleon's book 'Steal like an artist'. It's very visual but does a good job of it, as far as I can tell so far, and has some wise comments to make. Here's one of its banners:


Short story submission for the new 'Arc' magazine

The staff at New Scientist have brought out a new digital magazine called Arc. It's a mix of articles about the future and short stories and is available on the iPad (which I don't have), Kindle (nope, don't have that either) and Mac (hooray! I have one of those).

They've also asked for short story submissions for the next issue. The theme of submissions is 'The Future always wins'. Being a big fan of science fiction, I've put together my own contribution. Initially, I thought about writing a serious narrative story describing loss of identity, invasive technology, the sort of stuff elegantly described in books by William Gibson, Neal Stephenson and Philip K. Dick, but I didn't really come up with much.

Instead, I decided that it would be fun to write a dialogue exposing the banality of peoples' use of technology and how it still can't help them understand their partner. We have incredible kit at our disposal, such as the modern smartphone, but most of us have no understanding of how it works and we use smartphones for the dumbest of reasons. It's a strange world where a GPS satellite network, thousands of gigabit processors, clocks that lose a second every billion years and other marvels are employed so someone can pass around a video of their mate throwing up. The future, I think, is highly unlikely to be like Star Trek. As Scott Adams perceptively pointed out in 'The Dilbert Future' and Terry Pratchett has stated in various articles, it'll probably be a lot more cringeworthy.

If you'd like to read my short story, ''18% happier' then click on the link.

Share and Enjoy.... share and enjoy...

Self publishing in the UK - my progress so far

There's a bit of a lull for me at the moment - I'm waiting for various stuff to be done by other people - so I thought I'd jot down my experiences so far in self-publishing.

I'm in the process of self-publishing my non-fiction book, The Golden Web. I'm following the self-publishing route for the book because the standard non-fiction publishing route isn't really available to me. Since I'm not a television presenter or senior scientist or academic, it's unlikely a publishing house would want to commit funds to try and sell my book. I also don't have any personal connections in the UK publishing industry so I can't call on any favours or phone any ex-school publisher friends asking them to add The Golden Web to their list. That's okay though, because you don't have to be well known person to get a non-fiction book published and sold nowadays. Hooray!


My writing mistakes - volume 1

I thought it would be good to write about all the writing mistakes I’ve made. When writing is done well, it looks simple and effortless. Cormac McCarthy’s ‘The Road’ is a good example, along with anything by John Steinbeck. The problem is that a fledgling writer can easily think that excellent prose is simple to do because it looks simple. I made that mistake. In fact, I made so many mistakes that I’ve lost track of all of them. Writing good prose is like having a slim, fit body. A lucky few can develop one with even seeming to try. For the rest of us, it’s an endless effort to keep off the flab.
Here is a list of my most memorable mistakes. If you’ve read about them in an earlier blog of mine, I apologise. I also mistakenly repeat things.


Feedback from Cornerhouse theatre

I've got some feedback from the Cornerhouse theatre in Surbiton about the play I sent them entitled 'Can't see, won't see'. You can read it here: Can't see, won't see. Unfortunately, they won't be putting it on. This isn't much of a surprise since I only spotted at the last minute before submission that they were after family friendly plays!


Writing advice

Is there something I've learnt from all this writing? I think I've learnt a few things. Here's a list, using Copper Book as a reference work:

Write a lot: If you haven't written a lot of prose before, you'll need to write a hundred thousand words of prose and get that prose regularly assessed before you even start writing the prose for the novel! I know that sounds terrible, but that's what I effectively did in the end - write 100k of text and then write the whole thing again. Read More...

Copper Book just keeps on developing

There's nothing like chatting to people about your work to really get you interested in it again. I visited the london expo last sunday at the Excel centre in docklands. During my meanderings around the comic village stands, I struck up a conversation with the owner of the Mogzilla publishing company. They publish novels for a young readership and were happy to take a lot at Copper Book. They couldn't promise anything and didn't take on too many authors at a time, but they were willing to see what I've got. Read More...

Jonathan Cape Graphic Short Story competition

When the Arvon graphic novel course finished, I was all ready and motivated to do some comic work. Unfortunately, a very sad event occurred on the way back which I won't go into in a blog. Suffice it to say, that strongly affected the whole of the next week. What I was able to do though was get together an entry for the Jonathan Cape Graphic Short Story competition. The competition had been recommended to me on the course by Hannah Berry and I checked the details on my return home. I had a little over a week to produce a four page graphic short story. Yikes! I decided there wasn't time to think up a new story. I would have to use one I'd already written. In the end, I went for the frog poem I'd submitted to a climate change competition.

Here's what I produced:

It's catch up time... (with fun pics!)

Many apologies, but I haven't added a blog entry for months. It's been a hectic two months, for both good and bad reasons, but I'm going to try and catch up today.

The first entry that springs to mind is from the 18th September. I had booked to go on an Arvon Writing week ( The subject of the week was Graphic Novels and the tutors were Bryan Talbot and Hannah Berry. Since the week would be about creating stories with both text and images, I thought it would be good to get down and do some drawing. I had done drawing and painting before, but I'd only produced a few illustrations. I decided to dedicate the whole week to producing some fun black and white illustrations for Copper Book. In the end, I only got about three days of work done, but I did produce work I was very pleased with. Here's what I came up with: Read More...

My journey to work

I might not have my own flat nowadays, or be able to go on a fancy holiday, or buy the latest kit (have you seen the new 11" Apple MacBook Air? It's very nice...) but on the plus side, I don't have to commute into London every weekday. Hooray! Instead, I cycle the following route...

First off, it's into Bushy Park through Hampton gate. Read More...