New short-stories on the website

Just a quick note to say that I've added several science-fiction short stories to this website. At least one of them hasn't been on this website before (I think). If you'd like to read them, click on the highlighted links. They are:

18% Happier - This is a dialogue-based, comedy, science-fiction short-story in which a man rings a computer help-line and pours out his unhappiness at his girlfriend's behaviour, technology and the false-promises it has brought. This, I think, was a big step forward in terms of writing. I focussed on dialogue, a fast-pace and funny, thought-provoking ideas. Fortunately, it got a runners-up prize in Arc science-fiction magazine, which was a huge confidence boost.

The Lost Emotion (which is basically a monologue) This won a short-story competition in 'Arc' science-fiction magazine, years ago. I still like it. I especially the fact that it's based on an intriguing scientific discovery. that if we make an expression, we will feel the corresponding emotion. For example, if we make ourselves smile, we will feel happier. 'The Lost Emotion' expands on that idea, with a twist. Seasoned readers probably won't be surprised that it has a dystopian element but hey, I do try to make my stories at least a little realistic. ;-)

Tags is a science-fiction short story that draws upon the ideas and evidence I've described in my articles about a Laser Transmission from Sirius and Evolution and Alien Viruses. I entered the story in a competition, yonks ago, who's name I can't even remember but I didn't get selected. Rather than it being lost at the back of a proverbial shelf, here it is for you to read.

The Pique of Civilisation is another dialogue-based, science-fiction, comedy short story. I'm usually reluctant to write stupid female characters, although I have no problems at all writing stupid male characters. I guess that's a sort of inverted sexism. In this case, I did write two idiotic female characters and I think it works. These two ladies are incredibly shallow in an amusing way and there are ladies out there of that ilk, so it's a reasonable thing to do. Hopefully, you'll find it thought-provoking and funny too.

The Jekyll and Hyde of Fluoride

Several years ago, I changed my toothpaste. I did this because I’d worked out, through experimentation, that SLS (sodium lauryl sulphate), a foaming agent found in many bathroom and kitchen products, gave me clammy hands and mouth ulcers. Not surprisingly, I didn’t want it in my mouth any more. I found a different toothpaste that was SLS-free and began using it exclusively.


One side-effect of using this new toothpaste was that I was no longer brushing with fluoride, as the new toothpaste I’ve been using has no SLS or fluoride in its ingredients. I did wonder, at the time, if this might cause problems with my teeth, as fluoride is continually recommended to help avoid tooth decay. As this website article states, it's the 'super-hero of cavity fighting'. In the end, I thought it would be an interesting experiment to see how I got on without it. The years have gone and my teeth are still fine. I have no need for fillings, I have no gum problems and although my teeth aren’t perfect (they’re naturally a very pale yellow and a bit wonky), everything is fine inside my mouth. It would seem that I don't need this 'super-hero'.


Flight of the Conchords questions

As the New Zealand band ‘The Flight of the Conchords' will be touring the UK this month, I’ve put together a list of questions to ask the two guys. Hopefully, these questions will pass through the spirit-ether and appear to them in dreams. They’ll then answer the questions with their subconscious minds and I’ll receive their replies while day-dreaming about how to levitate, or possibly in the form of lyrics to weird ear-worm songs of unknown origin that I start humming to myself. For those who don't know these guys, check out this video:


Freezing Britain and methane bombs

This week, we are having unseasonable cold weather in the UK. Normally, at this time of year (end of February), temperatures here would be climbing into double figures as the sun rises higher in the sky. Instead, we are gripped with freezing day-time conditions, a sub-zero easterly wind and a fair amount of snow.


Some readers might conclude that such cold weather shows that fears of global warming are unfounded, or perhaps highly exaggerated. Tragically, this latest weather phenomenon, a mass-movement of cold air south, from the Arctic, is an indication that the opposite is true.


The dark possibilities of voice-command devices

The most recent fashionable item to own in Western households is a digital cylinder that understand your requests and carries them out, known as a vince-command device. Amazon’s Echo was the trailblazer in this field but Apple have caught up with their Alexa device. These devices, with their ability to listen to users, understand their speech, process the requests, reply and carry out the digital tasks, are being viewed as a boon to a busy household. Unfortunately, no one seems to be talking about the big potential problems that are inherent in these devices. Read More...

Mysterious excavated passage in the Great Pyramid antechamber

While browsing Youtube, I found this very interesting video about the Great Pyramid, created by 'Ancient Architects'. Ancient Architects is creating a lot of videos about ancient mysteries and their videos are invariably accessible, interesting and enjoyable. This video includes a short explanation of the theory of Jean Pierre Houdin, who believes that there is a secret access door to the King's Chamber, leading to hidden chambers, who's location may have been recently detected by muon scattering.

The special reason I'm mentioning this particular video in my blog is that it reports that there is now an excavated passage in the Great Pyramid's antechamber. I had no idea that this access passage existed. The video's author reports that the passage was recently excavated, then sealed off from the public by a locked, iron-grille door. Read More...

Robert Sepehr documentaries on Youtube

For the last year or so, Robert Sepehr has been posting interesting documentaries on Youtube. They cover a range of subjects, from anthropology to modern history. As many of their topics overlap with articles I've posted on this website, I thought it would be good to list four videos he's made that I've found interesting and thought-provoking. Unlike much that is posted on youtube, Robert Sepehr's videos are usually balanced and intelligent and don't veer off into wild speculation. They're also relatively free of ads, which makes them easier to watch too! I don't agree with everything he posts but I do think he's doing a good job. Here's the videos he's made that I've enjoyed, along with a few personal comments:


Edward Teller, climate change and 1959

There's a very interesting article in today's Guardian newspaper by Benjamin Franta. It concerns a symposium entitled 'Energy and Man' that took place in New York City in 1959, organised by the American Petroleum Industry as part of a celebration of 100 years of the American Petroleum industry. To quote from the article, 'Over 300 government officials, economists, historians, scientists, and industry executives were present'. Its guest of honour was Robert Dunlop but there was another famous face taking part, the brilliant physicist Edward Teller.

Edward Teller was a very right-wing man, almost as right-wing as his fellow ex-Hungarian, the genius scientist John Von Neumann, who supposedly became the inspiration for the character of 'Dr Strangelove' in Stanley Kubrick's famous movie. Both were firm advocates of a massive increase in arms spending and a deep-seated fear and hostility towards the Soviet Union. Von Neumann famously admitted to a congressional committee that he would carpet-bomb the entire Soviet nation at the first opportunity. Read More...

Keep them ill, keep them scared

The United States of America, along with the United Kingdom and France, are very keen on Ancient Greek and Roman architecture. Their capitals are filled with columned temples, obelisks, triumphal arches and other visual motifs from those ancient, Mediterranean civilisations. These countries' also like to talk about how they've inherited a key process in collective decision-making, known as democracy.

Democracy was developed by the Athenian city-state, and others, as a way to collectively decide what to do. Athenians would discuss openly their views on key subjects and then take a vote. This process is now used worldwide to decide national matters. This all sounds great but in truth, how much is modern, Western democracy really like Classical, Athenian democracy? Read More...

Secret Societies, Parasites and Climate Change

A very unusual event happened this week in Britain. The current chair of the Police Federation, Steve White, is stepping down from his role, but before leaving, he has openly stated his concerns about the continued influence of Freemasons in the British Police. He felt that they were an obstacle to reform and modernisation of the police service. To quote from the Guardian article, White said:

“It’s about trust and confidence. There are people who feel that being a Freemason and a police officer is not necessarily a good idea. I find it odd that there are pockets of the organisation where a significant number of representatives are Freemasons.”

In my experience, it’s very unusual for any person in a senior role in the UK to criticise the Freemasons. Some might say that this because the Freemasons have only a minor influence in our country. Unfortunately, White’s comments indicate that a very different problem is present; that Freemasons have a very strong influence in at least one major organisation in our country. It has been common knowledge for a long time that the Freemasons are rife in Britain's police force, its judiciary, its civil service and its military. If this is correct, then Freemasons have a great deal of influence and control over the running of British society. Is this something we should be worried about? Read More...